When they aren’t getting hit by boats, which is their number one cause of death, they suffer from crazy guys jumping on their backs or ladies trying to take them for a joy ride. Unusually cold weather can kill off hundreds, as well, as it did in the winter of 2010. Sadly, 2013 has been the deadliest year on record for manatees, due in part to a toxic red algae bloom, which can poison the manatees and other wildlife, causing paralyses and eventual drowning.
In April of this year, 241 manatees had been reported killed due to the algae. Now the number of dead manatees has risen to 769 so far this year, which is a record high. 

Learn more: Florida manatees dying in record numbers, 769 dead in 2013 

When they aren’t getting hit by boats, which is their number one cause of death, they suffer from crazy guys jumping on their backs or ladies trying to take them for a joy ride. Unusually cold weather can kill off hundreds, as well, as it did in the winter of 2010. Sadly, 2013 has been the deadliest year on record for manatees, due in part to a toxic red algae bloom, which can poison the manatees and other wildlife, causing paralyses and eventual drowning.

In April of this year, 241 manatees had been reported killed due to the algae. Now the number of dead manatees has risen to 769 so far this year, which is a record high. 

Learn more: Florida manatees dying in record numbers, 769 dead in 2013 

Climate change is killing the moose 
“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

Climate change is killing the moose 

“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

How a cattle baron saved California’s elk from extinction [Photos] - It is not often that we can thank cattle ranchers for the preservation of wild grazing species. But throughout history there are ranchers we tip our hats to for the conservation work they have done, helping protect wildlife and wild spaces. Tule elk, the smallest elk on the continent, is one such species that has not one but two cattle ranchers to thank for their continued existence.

How a cattle baron saved California’s elk from extinction [Photos] - It is not often that we can thank cattle ranchers for the preservation of wild grazing species. But throughout history there are ranchers we tip our hats to for the conservation work they have done, helping protect wildlife and wild spaces. Tule elk, the smallest elk on the continent, is one such species that has not one but two cattle ranchers to thank for their continued existence.

Leave it to PBS to provide us with everything we need to go “Awwwww!!” for the full duration of a documentary. Premiering next week, on Wednesday October 16th, is Saving Otter 501, a documentary about an orphaned sea otter rescued on a beach in Monterey, California — one of the few spots in California where sea otters can be found.

Click through to check out the trailer for this ridiculously cute (and educational) documentary.

"Here, in a timelapse video made by Mittermeier and fellow photographer Neil Ever Osborne, you can see just how much interaction the manatees are forced to deal with all day, every day. You’ll even see a manatee stampede, which happens when a sudden loud noise onshore scares them. Mittermeier states that this happens several times a day. The video reveals just how little space manatees get for themselves, and how much more protection we need to be offering these animals who are, we cannot forget, members of an endangered species."