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British artist, Helen Musselwhite does with a scalpel and paper what our minds do in a deep dream: build layer upon layer until something fantastic and otherworldly has been created. Many of her paper cut artworks are comforting and familiar, like her many forest scenes and portraits of woodland creatures (see next pages), but she’s equally capable of creating eerie or grotesque figures, like with her wonderful series of skulls.
via Helen Musselwhite’s paper cut artwork inspired by nature

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British artist, Helen Musselwhite does with a scalpel and paper what our minds do in a deep dream: build layer upon layer until something fantastic and otherworldly has been created. Many of her paper cut artworks are comforting and familiar, like her many forest scenes and portraits of woodland creatures (see next pages), but she’s equally capable of creating eerie or grotesque figures, like with her wonderful series of skulls.

via Helen Musselwhite’s paper cut artwork inspired by nature

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.
….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 
via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.

….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 

via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

Like Richard Shilling’s use of twigs and leaves to remind us of the simple beauty of nature or the guns Sonia Rentsch forms with flower buds, nuts and sticks to raise the issue of environmental degradation and violence, Yulia Brodskaya utilizes paper — perhaps the most basic art material available — and a technique called “quilling” that involves twisting and folding strips of paper in such a way that she forces the viewer to not only appreciate her finished work, but also reconsider how we look at the raw materials she’s using.
See more: Yulia Brodskaya’s mesmerizing quilled paper portraits


credit: Yulia Brodskaya

Like Richard Shilling’s use of twigs and leaves to remind us of the simple beauty of nature or the guns Sonia Rentsch forms with flower buds, nuts and sticks to raise the issue of environmental degradation and violence, Yulia Brodskaya utilizes paper — perhaps the most basic art material available — and a technique called “quilling” that involves twisting and folding strips of paper in such a way that she forces the viewer to not only appreciate her finished work, but also reconsider how we look at the raw materials she’s using.

See more: Yulia Brodskaya’s mesmerizing quilled paper portraits

credit: Yulia Brodskaya

© Chad Wright
Chad Wright’s sand castle series “is meant to juxtapose the playful childhood experience of building sand castles on the beach with his brother, versus the grim, modern-day reality of our current real estate collapse.”That is an apt interpretation, especially in the context of our struggling economy. However, as someone that thinks and writes often about climate change, including the growing concerns over how rising sea levels will force people to migrate away from the coasts, it’s hard not to see these photos as a statement on global warming, as well.
More photos via Artist Chad Wright portrays The American Dream washing into the sea

© Chad Wright

Chad Wright’s sand castle series “is meant to juxtapose the playful childhood experience of building sand castles on the beach with his brother, versus the grim, modern-day reality of our current real estate collapse.”

That is an apt interpretation, especially in the context of our struggling economy. However, as someone that thinks and writes often about climate change, including the growing concerns over how rising sea levels will force people to migrate away from the coasts, it’s hard not to see these photos as a statement on global warming, as well.

More photos via Artist Chad Wright portrays The American Dream washing into the sea

Artist Sonia Rentsch created this striking series of sculptures for January Biannual (photographed by Albert Comper and art direction by Olivia Nichols), using natural materials like leaves, sticks and seed pods to mimic the form of guns and other weapons. Entitled “Harm Less,” the images stir thoughts of beauty and violence within man and nature.
See the rest: Artist Sonia Rentsch creates guns made from nature

Artist Sonia Rentsch created this striking series of sculptures for January Biannual (photographed by Albert Comper and art direction by Olivia Nichols), using natural materials like leaves, sticks and seed pods to mimic the form of guns and other weapons. Entitled “Harm Less,” the images stir thoughts of beauty and violence within man and nature.

See the rest: Artist Sonia Rentsch creates guns made from nature

credit: Thierry Cohen, courtesy of Danziger Gallery
Does a lightless skyline imply a lifeless city? Do these images instill a sense of eerie doom or peaceful silence? In other words, are you afraid of the dark? Thierry Cohen's latest collection, “Villes Enteintes” or Darkened Cities, will make you consider the familiar sites of bright lights, big city. In the incredible series of digital photographs, Cohen shows us the world’s great cities with darkened skylines, set against the actual star-filled skies urban dwellers never see. 

Learn more about how he made these images and see the darkened skylines  at TreeHugger. 

credit: Thierry Cohen, courtesy of Danziger Gallery

Does a lightless skyline imply a lifeless city? Do these images instill a sense of eerie doom or peaceful silence? In other words, are you afraid of the dark? Thierry Cohen's latest collection, “Villes Enteintes” or Darkened Cities, will make you consider the familiar sites of bright lights, big city. In the incredible series of digital photographs, Cohen shows us the world’s great cities with darkened skylines, set against the actual star-filled skies urban dwellers never see. 


Learn more about how he made these images and see the darkened skylines  at TreeHugger. 

British artist Tony Plant, a sand-painter and photographer who borrows his canvas from nature by using the wet sand of low-lying coastal lands of England as his working surface. His art is deceptively simple but impressive, employing simple tools like garden rakes to create large-scale sand artworks.
(via Artist’s Massive Sand Paintings Disappear With the Tides (Video) : TreeHugger)

British artist Tony Plant, a sand-painter and photographer who borrows his canvas from nature by using the wet sand of low-lying coastal lands of England as his working surface. His art is deceptively simple but impressive, employing simple tools like garden rakes to create large-scale sand artworks.

(via Artist’s Massive Sand Paintings Disappear With the Tides (Video) : TreeHugger)