You know how to turn a global-warming denier who has little interest in the environmental consequences of burning fossil fuels into a bird lover? Bring up the topic of wind power. Instantly the risks of population declines and extinctions, previously ignored, become important. Every bird is precious!

We mention this because — ta-da! — some science has indeed come in on at least one wind-bird dilemma: the question of wind power’s potential impact on the greater prairie chicken.

© Andreu Carulla
Andreu Carulla’s NeighBirds is a clever take on the birdhouse. 
Each birdhouse is hand-crafted into a hexagon from untreated pine. As a stand-alone birdhouse NeighBirds is a perfectly fine birdhouse. The genius of the design comes into play when the love birds decide to start a family.
(via NeighBirds: Brilliant, Modular Birdhouse Expands Into Bird Neighborhood (Photos) : TreeHugger)

© Andreu Carulla

Andreu Carulla’s NeighBirds is a clever take on the birdhouse. 

Each birdhouse is hand-crafted into a hexagon from untreated pine. As a stand-alone birdhouse NeighBirds is a perfectly fine birdhouse. The genius of the design comes into play when the love birds decide to start a family.

(via NeighBirds: Brilliant, Modular Birdhouse Expands Into Bird Neighborhood (Photos) : TreeHugger)

Street artist Thomas “Dambo” Winther’s Happy City Birds project is upcycling trash into birdhouses for natures little recyclers. 
“Birds are actually great at recycling and we need to appreciate this. They eat old food, fruits, berries, and nuts lying about. In that way, they help to clean and distribute seeds around our cities, so new plants can grow.”
(via Artists Takes Trash to New Heights as Habitat for Urban Birds : TreeHugger)

Street artist Thomas “Dambo” Winther’s Happy City Birds project is upcycling trash into birdhouses for natures little recyclers. 

“Birds are actually great at recycling and we need to appreciate this. They eat old food, fruits, berries, and nuts lying about. In that way, they help to clean and distribute seeds around our cities, so new plants can grow.”

(via Artists Takes Trash to New Heights as Habitat for Urban Birds : TreeHugger)