For the Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan, the traditional way of winter-proofed building is called “chise,” referring to a home that is built with earth, clad with bamboo and sedge grasses, with radiantly heated floors and interiors kept warm by a central hearth that is never allowed to go out.
© Kengo Kuma & Associates
In an experimental project for the Meme Meadows environmental research facility on Japan’s Hokkaido island, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has constructed a dwelling that uses these indigenous principles and combined them with modern materials to create a translucent house that operates in rhythm with natural patterns of light and heating.
See more photos: Experimental Japanese Winter Cabin Blends Traditional Methods with Modern Materials

For the Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan, the traditional way of winter-proofed building is called “chise,” referring to a home that is built with earth, clad with bamboo and sedge grasses, with radiantly heated floors and interiors kept warm by a central hearth that is never allowed to go out.

image
© Kengo Kuma & Associates

In an experimental project for the Meme Meadows environmental research facility on Japan’s Hokkaido island, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has constructed a dwelling that uses these indigenous principles and combined them with modern materials to create a translucent house that operates in rhythm with natural patterns of light and heating.

See more photos: Experimental Japanese Winter Cabin Blends Traditional Methods with Modern Materials

imageSaw this was shared by Designed For Life and The Black Workshop but without information about the designer.

The architect is Tom Kundig and the building is intended as a fishing cabin. The stilts are to keep the building safe from flooding. And the large windows can be covered with the movable walls to keep it secure when not in use. See more photos here.