Climate change is killing the moose 
“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

Climate change is killing the moose 

“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

"When Hurricane Sandy came, the force of the waves flattened the dunes but left the town’s Boardwalk and the houses just 75 feet from it intact. Plans to restore the Bradley Beach dunes are already under way. The town’s dune-barrier project cost about $10,000 in 1996, Mr. Bianchi said. The town suffered $2 million to $3 million in damage, officials said, while many of its unprotected coastal neighbors were devastated.
“People complained about how high they were, but now they’re not complaining,” Mr. Bianchi said. “They’re praising.””(via As sea levels and storm surge are predicted to rise, fights over sand dunes tear coastal communities apart : TreeHugger)

"When Hurricane Sandy came, the force of the waves flattened the dunes but left the town’s Boardwalk and the houses just 75 feet from it intact. Plans to restore the Bradley Beach dunes are already under way. The town’s dune-barrier project cost about $10,000 in 1996, Mr. Bianchi said. The town suffered $2 million to $3 million in damage, officials said, while many of its unprotected coastal neighbors were devastated.

“People complained about how high they were, but now they’re not complaining,” Mr. Bianchi said. “They’re praising.””

(via As sea levels and storm surge are predicted to rise, fights over sand dunes tear coastal communities apart : TreeHugger)

In the last few years, it has blocked the construction of dozens of coal-fired power plants, fought the oil industry to a draw on the Keystone pipeline, convinced a wide swath of American institutions to divest themselves of their fossil fuel stocks, and challenged practices like mountaintop-removal coal mining and fracking for natural gas. It may not be winning the way gay marriage has won, but the movement itself continues to grow quickly, and it’s starting to claim some victories.

That’s not despite its lack of clearly identifiable leaders, I think. It’s because of it.

Last week, Professor Anthony Ingraffea published a strong op-ed in The New York Times, in which he noted that “unless [natural gas] leaks can be kept below 2 percent, gas lacks any climate advantage over coal.”
Now, a new study confirms those concerns, finding that, on average, 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking. 
Details here: Natural Gas: 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking, study finds

Last week, Professor Anthony Ingraffea published a strong op-ed in The New York Times, in which he noted that “unless [natural gas] leaks can be kept below 2 percent, gas lacks any climate advantage over coal.”

Now, a new study confirms those concerns, finding that, on average, 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking. 

Details here: Natural Gas: 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking, study finds

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.
….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 
via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.

….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 

via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

A natural gas drilling rig has exploded and caught fire off the coast of Louisiana. After two days, the fire is finally under control, but the incident has rekindled debate about the safety of offshore drilling. 
Details here: UPDATE: Gas well on fire in Gulf of Mexico, 44 evacuated

A natural gas drilling rig has exploded and caught fire off the coast of Louisiana. After two days, the fire is finally under control, but the incident has rekindled debate about the safety of offshore drilling. 

Details here: UPDATE: Gas well on fire in Gulf of Mexico, 44 evacuated

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.
For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.
An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta 

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.

For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.

An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta