Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.
This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building. 
Read the rest:  The world’s most beautiful wastewater treatment plant

Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.

This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building. 

Read the rest:  The world’s most beautiful wastewater treatment plant

New York City is getting a new beach! "The area — 11,000 square feet at low tide — will feature sand, terraced seating, a kayak launch, a spot for fishing, tree-lined walkways and concession stands, all just minutes from Wall Street in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge."via NYC to build Brooklyn Bridge Beach along East River

New York City is getting a new beach!

"The area — 11,000 square feet at low tide — will feature sand, terraced seating, a kayak launch, a spot for fishing, tree-lined walkways and concession stands, all just minutes from Wall Street in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge."

via NYC to build Brooklyn Bridge Beach along East River

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.
….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 
via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

The idea that art has the power to move, persuade and even inspire change is an old one. “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society, but a hammer with which to shape it,” declared Bertolt Brecht. But climate change poses some tough problems for artists: as a concept, it has long seemed too big, too grim, too abstract, too political and too far away. Efforts to portray it quickly become too preachy, too scientific, too shaming. Few can make a living from making people feel bad about themselves and doomed about the world.

….until they can. The tide is turning and many artists are finding inspiration in climate change and environmental issues. Here are some of our favorites: 

via In midst of climate change crisis, art helps us cope

Like Richard Shilling’s use of twigs and leaves to remind us of the simple beauty of nature or the guns Sonia Rentsch forms with flower buds, nuts and sticks to raise the issue of environmental degradation and violence, Yulia Brodskaya utilizes paper — perhaps the most basic art material available — and a technique called “quilling” that involves twisting and folding strips of paper in such a way that she forces the viewer to not only appreciate her finished work, but also reconsider how we look at the raw materials she’s using.
See more: Yulia Brodskaya’s mesmerizing quilled paper portraits


credit: Yulia Brodskaya

Like Richard Shilling’s use of twigs and leaves to remind us of the simple beauty of nature or the guns Sonia Rentsch forms with flower buds, nuts and sticks to raise the issue of environmental degradation and violence, Yulia Brodskaya utilizes paper — perhaps the most basic art material available — and a technique called “quilling” that involves twisting and folding strips of paper in such a way that she forces the viewer to not only appreciate her finished work, but also reconsider how we look at the raw materials she’s using.

See more: Yulia Brodskaya’s mesmerizing quilled paper portraits

credit: Yulia Brodskaya