Last week, Professor Anthony Ingraffea published a strong op-ed in The New York Times, in which he noted that “unless [natural gas] leaks can be kept below 2 percent, gas lacks any climate advantage over coal.”
Now, a new study confirms those concerns, finding that, on average, 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking. 
Details here: Natural Gas: 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking, study finds

Last week, Professor Anthony Ingraffea published a strong op-ed in The New York Times, in which he noted that “unless [natural gas] leaks can be kept below 2 percent, gas lacks any climate advantage over coal.”

Now, a new study confirms those concerns, finding that, on average, 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking. 

Details here: Natural Gas: 6 to 12 percent of the methane produced is leaking, study finds

A natural gas drilling rig has exploded and caught fire off the coast of Louisiana. After two days, the fire is finally under control, but the incident has rekindled debate about the safety of offshore drilling. 
Details here: UPDATE: Gas well on fire in Gulf of Mexico, 44 evacuated

A natural gas drilling rig has exploded and caught fire off the coast of Louisiana. After two days, the fire is finally under control, but the incident has rekindled debate about the safety of offshore drilling. 

Details here: UPDATE: Gas well on fire in Gulf of Mexico, 44 evacuated

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.
For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.
An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta 

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.

For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.

An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta 

According to MicroPower Global, somewhere in the neighborhood of half of the money spent producing energy ends up as waste heat, which could be at least partially recaptured to lower overall energy use. To that end, the company is developing what they are calling the “world’s most efficient semiconductor chip” that can generate about triple the amount of energy that current thermoelectric technology can.
"For 40 years the citizens of southeast Montana have been repeatedly asked to absorb the impacts of natural resource extraction. We have done our part. We have sacrificed the loss of water, land, property, and quality of life for others to enjoy electricity at the flick of a switch. We have given enough, and the time has come to say no more."
via Things of Intrinsic Worth shows how coal power damages Montana’s ranching lifestyle

"For 40 years the citizens of southeast Montana have been repeatedly asked to absorb the impacts of natural resource extraction. We have done our part. We have sacrificed the loss of water, land, property, and quality of life for others to enjoy electricity at the flick of a switch. We have given enough, and the time has come to say no more."

via Things of Intrinsic Worth shows how coal power damages Montana’s ranching lifestyle

Cynthia Giles, the E.P.A. assistant administrator for enforcement and compliance, said that the State Department had failed to adequately support its two fundamental conclusions supporting the project — that the climate change effects of building the pipeline would be negligible, and that Canada would develop the oil sands regardless of whether the $7 billion pipeline is built.