© Yojiro Oshima
Wood may not seem like the best material for a bicycle, but considering how energy-intensive it is to process metals, wooden bikes seem like a more reasonably earth-friendly alternative, and may even be a better ride. Though we’ve seen no shortage of stylish wooden bikes, this sculptural beauty by Yojiro Oshima, a design student at Tokyo’s Musashino Art University, is quite the head-turner.
via Sculptural Japanese wooden bike sports serious curves

© Yojiro Oshima

Wood may not seem like the best material for a bicycle, but considering how energy-intensive it is to process metals, wooden bikes seem like a more reasonably earth-friendly alternative, and may even be a better ride. Though we’ve seen no shortage of stylish wooden bikes, this sculptural beauty by Yojiro Oshima, a design student at Tokyo’s Musashino Art University, is quite the head-turner.

via Sculptural Japanese wooden bike sports serious curves

© Athanasia Leivaditou
Every architecture student has done it: The all-nighter where you end up sleeping on or under your desk. (When I did it, it was under a traditional drafting table). Now designer Athanasia Leivaditou of StudioNL has brought a whole new level of comfort to the overnight in the studio with this clever desk that hides a bed.  Transformer desk turns into bedroom

© Athanasia Leivaditou

Every architecture student has done it: The all-nighter where you end up sleeping on or under your desk. (When I did it, it was under a traditional drafting table). Now designer Athanasia Leivaditou of StudioNL has brought a whole new level of comfort to the overnight in the studio with this clever desk that hides a bed.  Transformer desk turns into bedroom

Gizmodo takes a video tour through TreeHugger founder, Graham Hill’s Life Edited apartment. 

Michael Hession summarizes the space:

It is the project of Graham Hill, entrepreneur and treehugger.com founder, to come up with an ideal New York apartment—one with a small footprint, both physically and environmentally, and one that offers just as much beauty and functionality as a pad multiple times its size….. When you walk in, you encounter what is, at first glance, a small studio apartment. Within that cube are actually 8 functional spaces. The living room and office become the bedroom with a tug of a bookshelf. Open one of the closets and you’ll find 10 stackable chairs that go around a telescopic dining table for large dinner parties. An entire guest room with bunk-beds and a closet is revealed behind a wall that slides out on tracks. And of course, a well-equipped kitchen and bathroom await.

Graham Hill:

I actually don’t think it takes much to make most people happy. We want to live in a healthy environment, enjoy good physical health, have great relationships, have time for recreation and live in peace.

On the other hand, happiness often requires removal. Many of us could stand to scale back on our possessions, space, debt and activities. Most of us have found that the things we thought would make us happy actually stress us out and can make us miserable.

So “editing” means removing all that detracts from our happiness. This is not a passive act; as Blaise Pascal put it, “I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time.” Editing takes effort.

TreeHugger founder, Graham Hill has a new project called LifeEdited. Where TreeHugger aims to show that environmentalism doesn’t have to be about outdated stereotypes, LifeEdited aims to show us that less isn’t just more. It’s better. Read why Graham says, “Nothing is the Next Big Thing.