When they aren’t getting hit by boats, which is their number one cause of death, they suffer from crazy guys jumping on their backs or ladies trying to take them for a joy ride. Unusually cold weather can kill off hundreds, as well, as it did in the winter of 2010. Sadly, 2013 has been the deadliest year on record for manatees, due in part to a toxic red algae bloom, which can poison the manatees and other wildlife, causing paralyses and eventual drowning.
In April of this year, 241 manatees had been reported killed due to the algae. Now the number of dead manatees has risen to 769 so far this year, which is a record high. 

Learn more: Florida manatees dying in record numbers, 769 dead in 2013 

When they aren’t getting hit by boats, which is their number one cause of death, they suffer from crazy guys jumping on their backs or ladies trying to take them for a joy ride. Unusually cold weather can kill off hundreds, as well, as it did in the winter of 2010. Sadly, 2013 has been the deadliest year on record for manatees, due in part to a toxic red algae bloom, which can poison the manatees and other wildlife, causing paralyses and eventual drowning.

In April of this year, 241 manatees had been reported killed due to the algae. Now the number of dead manatees has risen to 769 so far this year, which is a record high. 

Learn more: Florida manatees dying in record numbers, 769 dead in 2013 

Climate change is killing the moose 
“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

Climate change is killing the moose 

“Winters have grown substantially shorter across much of the moose’s range. In New Hampshire, a longer fall with less snow has greatly increased the number of winter ticks, a devastating parasite. “You can get 100,000 ticks on a moose,” said Kristine Rines, a biologist with the state’s Fish and Game Department.” 

Our consciousness, particular when under the kind of economic pressure we’ve been under, is still not where it needs to be to develop the solutions that are most-likely to work. What do I mean by that? If you want a future of shared responsibilities, shared opportunities and shared sense of community, you have to believe certain things. You have to believe that creative cooperation is better than constant conflict. You have to believe that we’re all in this together. You have to believe that our differences are interesting, they make life more interesting. They are exciting, but our common humanity matters more. You have to be willing to look at science and let your eyes overcome your ideology.
Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.
This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building. 
Read the rest:  The world’s most beautiful wastewater treatment plant

Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.

This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building. 

Read the rest:  The world’s most beautiful wastewater treatment plant

The wildlife trafficking crisis has been growing in recent years, but the United States seems to be gearing up to do much more to fight the problem.
On July 1, President Obama issued an Executive Order on the issue of combating wildlife trafficking. With that order, Obama established a cabinet-level Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking and ordered it to present a plan of action on how the US should address the trafficking crisis.
We’re beginning to see the fruits of their labor. On Monday, the White House announced a series of steps they are taking to combat this crisis, including that the United States will be destroying its 6 ton stockpile of illegal ivory it has been collecting for 25 years.
Is this wise? 

Chris Tackett wonders if this is the right way to deter poachers. 
“elephants may be extinct in a matter of decades and we’re talking about how to destroy stockpiles of evidence of their existence. Is this the wisest choice?”
Read the rest of his argument here: US to destroy 6 ton illegal ivory stockpile

The wildlife trafficking crisis has been growing in recent years, but the United States seems to be gearing up to do much more to fight the problem.

On July 1, President Obama issued an Executive Order on the issue of combating wildlife trafficking. With that order, Obama established a cabinet-level Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking and ordered it to present a plan of action on how the US should address the trafficking crisis.

We’re beginning to see the fruits of their labor. On Monday, the White House announced a series of steps they are taking to combat this crisis, including that the United States will be destroying its 6 ton stockpile of illegal ivory it has been collecting for 25 years.

Is this wise? 

Chris Tackett wonders if this is the right way to deter poachers. 

“elephants may be extinct in a matter of decades and we’re talking about how to destroy stockpiles of evidence of their existence. Is this the wisest choice?”

Read the rest of his argument here: US to destroy 6 ton illegal ivory stockpile

A new study in the journal Science by researchers from Duke and North Carolina State University shows that humans are not protecting the right parts of the world if our goal is to conserve biological diversity. The researchers found that “67% of plant species live entirely within regions that comprise 17% of the land surface.”
via Protecting just 17% of Earth’s land would save 67% of plant species. Can we do it before it’s too late?

new study in the journal Science by researchers from Duke and North Carolina State University shows that humans are not protecting the right parts of the world if our goal is to conserve biological diversity. The researchers found that “67% of plant species live entirely within regions that comprise 17% of the land surface.”

via Protecting just 17% of Earth’s land would save 67% of plant species. Can we do it before it’s too late?