The world is changing constantly and there is so much to document across the globe. Believing we have enough images in photographer’s archives to do the trick is ludicrous. But more importantly than that, we need both past and current images. Older images are in fact being used constantly to make a point. Not only are older photographs often used in new awareness campaigns or in articles on the topic, but older photographs are also used as a comparison to show what once was, and what now isn’t.
(via Conservation photography and necessary evils : TreeHugger)

The world is changing constantly and there is so much to document across the globe. Believing we have enough images in photographer’s archives to do the trick is ludicrous. But more importantly than that, we need both past and current images. Older images are in fact being used constantly to make a point. Not only are older photographs often used in new awareness campaigns or in articles on the topic, but older photographs are also used as a comparison to show what once was, and what now isn’t.

(via Conservation photography and necessary evils : TreeHugger)

You don’t need the latest and greatest device to be able to record the beauty of the world. You need an artistic eye, a drive to find it, and a device that you have mastered well enough to capture the moment.

Think about it. Some of the greatest images the world has seen have been captured on what some may call “obsolete” old-fashioned cameras with “out-dated” technology. Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism, used a Leica film camera — a ridiculous old contraption that has no place in the modern digital world, right? Well… Keep in mind that the reason few people today can compare their work to that of Cartier-Bresson, despite the fact that practically anyone has access to a fancy DLSR, is because few people have an eye for “the decisive moment.” Capturing a compelling image is not about what electronics you can buy — it is much more human than that.

To say that you must have the latest device in the marketplace to be able to keep an edge as a photographer is to ignore the most fundamental thing needed for creating beautiful images: You.

via Kevin Russ’s Stunning iPhone Photos Prove Technology Won’t Make You an Artist

© Jessica RathDrap d’or gueneme3” x 3.5” x 3.5” (each), high-fire glazed porcelain
From Richard Shilling’s land art sculptures to Brett Van Ort’s photos of land mine landscapes, some of my favorite art to feature here on TreeHugger is that which reminds us of the connection between man and the natural world.
From Jessica Rath’s project, take me to the apple breeder:.
"Intrigued by science journalist Michael Pollan’s description of rare, odd apples from the Noah’s Ark of apples in his book Botany of Desire, Jessica visited the Plant Genetics Resource Unit (PGRU) in Geneva, New York, a joint USDA/Cornell University project. The reason for this vast living collection… unknown to most people, edible apples cannot be planted from seed, they must be grafted from existing trees, thus keeping the variety literally “alive” to save it. At the PGRU, buds are collected from apple trees all over the world, then grafted onto dwarf rootstock and matured until fruiting."



(via Art Photo of the Day: Jessica Rath Uses Sculpture to Highlight Hybrid and Endangered Apples : TreeHugger)

© Jessica Rath
Drap d’or gueneme
3” x 3.5” x 3.5” (each), high-fire glazed porcelain

From Richard Shilling’s land art sculptures to Brett Van Ort’s photos of land mine landscapes, some of my favorite art to feature here on TreeHugger is that which reminds us of the connection between man and the natural world.

From Jessica Rath’s project, take me to the apple breeder:
.

"Intrigued by science journalist Michael Pollan’s description of rare, odd apples from the Noah’s Ark of apples in his book Botany of Desire, Jessica visited the Plant Genetics Resource Unit (PGRU) in Geneva, New York, a joint USDA/Cornell University project. The reason for this vast living collection… unknown to most people, edible apples cannot be planted from seed, they must be grafted from existing trees, thus keeping the variety literally “alive” to save it. At the PGRU, buds are collected from apple trees all over the world, then grafted onto dwarf rootstock and matured until fruiting."

(via Art Photo of the Day: Jessica Rath Uses Sculpture to Highlight Hybrid and Endangered Apples : TreeHugger)

© Kim Preston
Ocean plastic pollution is a serious issue. Plastics that have made their way into open waters are often mistaken for food by marine animals — and it is no wonder when you look at plastic objects the way photographer Kim Prestonhas positioned them. Floating among the infinite blue, plastic objects look like jellies, fish, polyps and other edible sealife. And as Preston’s work also highlights, a world of plastic “life”forms is what we are quickly turning our oceans into.
See the whole collection via Plastic Objects Photographed to Look Like Sea Creatures

© Kim Preston

Ocean plastic pollution is a serious issue. Plastics that have made their way into open waters are often mistaken for food by marine animals — and it is no wonder when you look at plastic objects the way photographer Kim Prestonhas positioned them. Floating among the infinite blue, plastic objects look like jellies, fish, polyps and other edible sealife. And as Preston’s work also highlights, a world of plastic “life”forms is what we are quickly turning our oceans into.

See the whole collection via Plastic Objects Photographed to Look Like Sea Creatures