"Believe it or not, the presence of salmonella on chicken is both common and acceptable. (About a quarter of all chicken parts are contaminated, a fact of which F.S.I.S. is fully aware and which it is evaluating.) From the Centers for Disease Control: “It is not unusual for raw poultry from any producer to have salmonella bacteria. C.D.C. and U.S.D.A.-F.S.I.S. recommend consumers follow food safety tips to prevent salmonella infection from raw poultry produced by Foster Farms or any other brand.”
Right. But if salmonella was ever easily killed by careful handling and cooking, perhaps that is no longer the case; perhaps it’s more virulent and heartier, and it certainly now defies some antibiotics.”
- Mark Bittman on consumer risk of eating chicken. 

"Believe it or not, the presence of salmonella on chicken is both common and acceptable. (About a quarter of all chicken parts are contaminated, a fact of which F.S.I.S. is fully aware and which it is evaluating.) From the Centers for Disease Control: “It is not unusual for raw poultry from any producer to have salmonella bacteria. C.D.C. and U.S.D.A.-F.S.I.S. recommend consumers follow food safety tips to prevent salmonella infection from raw poultry produced by Foster Farms or any other brand.”

Right. But if salmonella was ever easily killed by careful handling and cooking, perhaps that is no longer the case; perhaps it’s more virulent and heartier, and it certainly now defies some antibiotics.”

- Mark Bittman on consumer risk of eating chicken. 

Our consciousness, particular when under the kind of economic pressure we’ve been under, is still not where it needs to be to develop the solutions that are most-likely to work. What do I mean by that? If you want a future of shared responsibilities, shared opportunities and shared sense of community, you have to believe certain things. You have to believe that creative cooperation is better than constant conflict. You have to believe that we’re all in this together. You have to believe that our differences are interesting, they make life more interesting. They are exciting, but our common humanity matters more. You have to be willing to look at science and let your eyes overcome your ideology.
The wildlife trafficking crisis has been growing in recent years, but the United States seems to be gearing up to do much more to fight the problem.
On July 1, President Obama issued an Executive Order on the issue of combating wildlife trafficking. With that order, Obama established a cabinet-level Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking and ordered it to present a plan of action on how the US should address the trafficking crisis.
We’re beginning to see the fruits of their labor. On Monday, the White House announced a series of steps they are taking to combat this crisis, including that the United States will be destroying its 6 ton stockpile of illegal ivory it has been collecting for 25 years.
Is this wise? 

Chris Tackett wonders if this is the right way to deter poachers. 
“elephants may be extinct in a matter of decades and we’re talking about how to destroy stockpiles of evidence of their existence. Is this the wisest choice?”
Read the rest of his argument here: US to destroy 6 ton illegal ivory stockpile

The wildlife trafficking crisis has been growing in recent years, but the United States seems to be gearing up to do much more to fight the problem.

On July 1, President Obama issued an Executive Order on the issue of combating wildlife trafficking. With that order, Obama established a cabinet-level Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking and ordered it to present a plan of action on how the US should address the trafficking crisis.

We’re beginning to see the fruits of their labor. On Monday, the White House announced a series of steps they are taking to combat this crisis, including that the United States will be destroying its 6 ton stockpile of illegal ivory it has been collecting for 25 years.

Is this wise? 

Chris Tackett wonders if this is the right way to deter poachers. 

“elephants may be extinct in a matter of decades and we’re talking about how to destroy stockpiles of evidence of their existence. Is this the wisest choice?”

Read the rest of his argument here: US to destroy 6 ton illegal ivory stockpile

"When Hurricane Sandy came, the force of the waves flattened the dunes but left the town’s Boardwalk and the houses just 75 feet from it intact. Plans to restore the Bradley Beach dunes are already under way. The town’s dune-barrier project cost about $10,000 in 1996, Mr. Bianchi said. The town suffered $2 million to $3 million in damage, officials said, while many of its unprotected coastal neighbors were devastated.
“People complained about how high they were, but now they’re not complaining,” Mr. Bianchi said. “They’re praising.””(via As sea levels and storm surge are predicted to rise, fights over sand dunes tear coastal communities apart : TreeHugger)

"When Hurricane Sandy came, the force of the waves flattened the dunes but left the town’s Boardwalk and the houses just 75 feet from it intact. Plans to restore the Bradley Beach dunes are already under way. The town’s dune-barrier project cost about $10,000 in 1996, Mr. Bianchi said. The town suffered $2 million to $3 million in damage, officials said, while many of its unprotected coastal neighbors were devastated.

“People complained about how high they were, but now they’re not complaining,” Mr. Bianchi said. “They’re praising.””

(via As sea levels and storm surge are predicted to rise, fights over sand dunes tear coastal communities apart : TreeHugger)

Imagine the most beautiful place in your state. It’s so nice!
Now, imagine six thousand hogs pooping all over that place. Not so nice, right?
That, in an extremely oversimplified way, is what the battle to save Arkansas’ Buffalo National River is all about.
“The CAFO will house up to 6,500 hogs and there will be some 2 million gallons of waste produced annually, which is a lot of hog crap.
After collecting the hog feces and urine in clay-bottomed ponds, the waste will be sprayed onto a dozen or so nearby fields. As gross as that sounds, it is a pretty standard way for factory farms to dispense of animal waste, but rarely are these industrial hog farms so close to a nationally protected river. And, you know, rain is a thing. And so are floods. So it defies common sense to think that this hog factory is not going to eventually end up polluting one of the most beautiful rivers in America.
So, yeah, this is a big deal.”

Read the rest: Save the Buffalo River! America’s first national river threatened by Cargill factory hog farm

Imagine the most beautiful place in your state. It’s so nice!

Now, imagine six thousand hogs pooping all over that place. Not so nice, right?

That, in an extremely oversimplified way, is what the battle to save Arkansas’ Buffalo National River is all about.

“The CAFO will house up to 6,500 hogs and there will be some 2 million gallons of waste produced annually, which is a lot of hog crap.

After collecting the hog feces and urine in clay-bottomed ponds, the waste will be sprayed onto a dozen or so nearby fields. As gross as that sounds, it is a pretty standard way for factory farms to dispense of animal waste, but rarely are these industrial hog farms so close to a nationally protected river. And, you know, rain is a thing. And so are floods. So it defies common sense to think that this hog factory is not going to eventually end up polluting one of the most beautiful rivers in America.

So, yeah, this is a big deal.”

Read the rest: Save the Buffalo River! America’s first national river threatened by Cargill factory hog farm

In the last few years, it has blocked the construction of dozens of coal-fired power plants, fought the oil industry to a draw on the Keystone pipeline, convinced a wide swath of American institutions to divest themselves of their fossil fuel stocks, and challenged practices like mountaintop-removal coal mining and fracking for natural gas. It may not be winning the way gay marriage has won, but the movement itself continues to grow quickly, and it’s starting to claim some victories.

That’s not despite its lack of clearly identifiable leaders, I think. It’s because of it.