Imagine the most beautiful place in your state. It’s so nice!
Now, imagine six thousand hogs pooping all over that place. Not so nice, right?
That, in an extremely oversimplified way, is what the battle to save Arkansas’ Buffalo National River is all about.
“The CAFO will house up to 6,500 hogs and there will be some 2 million gallons of waste produced annually, which is a lot of hog crap.
After collecting the hog feces and urine in clay-bottomed ponds, the waste will be sprayed onto a dozen or so nearby fields. As gross as that sounds, it is a pretty standard way for factory farms to dispense of animal waste, but rarely are these industrial hog farms so close to a nationally protected river. And, you know, rain is a thing. And so are floods. So it defies common sense to think that this hog factory is not going to eventually end up polluting one of the most beautiful rivers in America.
So, yeah, this is a big deal.”

Read the rest: Save the Buffalo River! America’s first national river threatened by Cargill factory hog farm

Imagine the most beautiful place in your state. It’s so nice!

Now, imagine six thousand hogs pooping all over that place. Not so nice, right?

That, in an extremely oversimplified way, is what the battle to save Arkansas’ Buffalo National River is all about.

“The CAFO will house up to 6,500 hogs and there will be some 2 million gallons of waste produced annually, which is a lot of hog crap.

After collecting the hog feces and urine in clay-bottomed ponds, the waste will be sprayed onto a dozen or so nearby fields. As gross as that sounds, it is a pretty standard way for factory farms to dispense of animal waste, but rarely are these industrial hog farms so close to a nationally protected river. And, you know, rain is a thing. And so are floods. So it defies common sense to think that this hog factory is not going to eventually end up polluting one of the most beautiful rivers in America.

So, yeah, this is a big deal.”

Read the rest: Save the Buffalo River! America’s first national river threatened by Cargill factory hog farm

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.
For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.
An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta 

As if ruptured pipelines, train explosions and drilling rig fires weren’t enough ways for oil to damage the environment, oil companies are now creating new types of disasters.

For at least six weeks, thousands of barrels of tar sands oil have been bubbling up into the forest in Cold Lake, Alberta and neither the oil company or government scientists know how to stop the flow.

An unstoppable oil leak is flowing in Alberta 

Cynthia Giles, the E.P.A. assistant administrator for enforcement and compliance, said that the State Department had failed to adequately support its two fundamental conclusions supporting the project — that the climate change effects of building the pipeline would be negligible, and that Canada would develop the oil sands regardless of whether the $7 billion pipeline is built.
Two weeks ago today, Exxon Mobil’s Pegasus pipeline carrying diluted bitumen from Canada ruptured catastrophically, creating a 22-foot long gash that unleashed hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil and toxic chemical diluents into the Central Arkansas town of Mayflower. Since then, the local media has faced strong intimidation from Exxon, local residents have become sick from the toxic fumes, a severe thunderstorm threatened cleanupefforts and led officials to release contaminated water into Lake Conway and the Attorney General of Arkansas has launched an investigation, as a number of lawsuits have been filed on behalf of residents.
via Exxon pipeline rupture is 22 feet long, indicating immense pressure, possible criminal negligence

Two weeks ago today, Exxon Mobil’s Pegasus pipeline carrying diluted bitumen from Canada ruptured catastrophically, creating a 22-foot long gash that unleashed hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil and toxic chemical diluents into the Central Arkansas town of Mayflower. Since then, the local media has faced strong intimidation from Exxon, local residents have become sick from the toxic fumes, a severe thunderstorm threatened cleanupefforts and led officials to release contaminated water into Lake Conway and the Attorney General of Arkansas has launched an investigation, as a number of lawsuits have been filed on behalf of residents.

via Exxon pipeline rupture is 22 feet long, indicating immense pressure, possible criminal negligence

BREAKING: Storm hits Mayflower, Arkansas site of Exxon oil spill. Contaminated water pumped into Lake Conway as citizen journalists report live.
A manmade disaster was made even worse by nature Wednesday night, as asevere thunderstorm hit Mayflower, Arkansas spreading the Exxon Mobil oil spill to the yards of homes along the cove and the main body of Lake Conway. For nearly two weeks, Exxon has maintained that oil has not reached Lake Conway, despite clear evidence both from aerial video and on-the-ground guerrilla reporting that showed oil had spread throughout a cove and wetlands, which are connected through ground water and drainage culverts to the main body of the lake. Images captured Wednesday night should put any doubt to rest that the main body of Lake Conway is now contaminated with oil.
Citizen journalists, Jak and Lauren, reporting for Tar Sands Blockade, braved the severe weather Wednesday, which included hail, lighting and chance of tornados, to report on what was happening to the site of the oil spill.
MORE: at TreeHugger

BREAKING: Storm hits Mayflower, Arkansas site of Exxon oil spill. Contaminated water pumped into Lake Conway as citizen journalists report live.

manmade disaster was made even worse by nature Wednesday night, as asevere thunderstorm hit Mayflower, Arkansas spreading the Exxon Mobil oil spill to the yards of homes along the cove and the main body of Lake Conway. For nearly two weeks, Exxon has maintained that oil has not reached Lake Conway, despite clear evidence both from aerial video and on-the-ground guerrilla reporting that showed oil had spread throughout a cove and wetlands, which are connected through ground water and drainage culverts to the main body of the lake. Images captured Wednesday night should put any doubt to rest that the main body of Lake Conway is now contaminated with oil.

Citizen journalists, Jak and Lauren, reporting for Tar Sands Blockade, braved the severe weather Wednesday, which included hail, lighting and chance of tornados, to report on what was happening to the site of the oil spill.

MORE: at TreeHugger

As Lloyd has noted on TreeHugger before, stopping the Keystone pipeline won’t keep the tar sands in the ground or the carbon they will produce out of the atmosphere. Trans Canada could build a pipeline to the west or continue shipping the oil by rail, but as KC makes clear, to not speak out against this pipeline is to concede defeat. And when the stakes are a ruined atmosphere or a chance at preventing catastrophe, what choice do we have?

In today’s you’ve got to be effing kidding me category: Climate activist Tim DeChristopher is out of prison, serving the remainder of his two-year sentence at a halfway house in Salt Lake City, Utah. That’s good news, but in a bizarre and unjust twist, DeChristopher is barred from working on any “social justice” work. What the?

© Elena Dorfman: “Empire Falling 8” / 2012, chromogenic print, 37” x 50”
Photographer Elena Dorfman made more than two dozen visits to the rock quarries of the Midwest, digging into forgotten corners of Kentucky, Ohio, and southern Indiana. With thousands of images shot, Dorfman then created a project-specific process of layering and ‘stitching’ the images together digitally to create the depth and mystery that the images possess. “Manipulating and reconstructing the landscape,” says Dorfman, “I reassemble and layer my images, emulating the natural process of stratum on stratum.” An individual image may be constructed from as many as three hundred photographs taken at multiple quarries.
via Photographer Captures Poignant Beauty of Industry-Ravaged Landscapes

© Elena Dorfman: “Empire Falling 8” / 2012, chromogenic print, 37” x 50”

Photographer Elena Dorfman made more than two dozen visits to the rock quarries of the Midwest, digging into forgotten corners of Kentucky, Ohio, and southern Indiana. With thousands of images shot, Dorfman then created a project-specific process of layering and ‘stitching’ the images together digitally to create the depth and mystery that the images possess. “Manipulating and reconstructing the landscape,” says Dorfman, “I reassemble and layer my images, emulating the natural process of stratum on stratum.” An individual image may be constructed from as many as three hundred photographs taken at multiple quarries.

via Photographer Captures Poignant Beauty of Industry-Ravaged Landscapes

credit: Sarah Fretwell
The use of conflict minerals in the technology industry is a serious issue, but one that manufacturers are doing little to correct. In areas where the sale of minerals is used to fund war, the abuses of human rights are abhorrent — with slavery and rape treated as a fact of life.
After traveling to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and interviewing victims of rape used as a weapon of war, photographer Sarah Fretwell put together a powerful photography project documented the people and their stories, photographs that are not just art but are tools for bringing awareness to the larger impact the technology industry has by using conflict minerals, and to the role consumers play by purchasing the products without asking questions about the materials used in manufacturing.
In this interview, partnered with her images, Fretwell describes the problem and outlines solutions.
(via Rape and Conflict Minerals: Photographer Takes on the Technology Industry Through Art : TreeHugger)

credit: Sarah Fretwell

The use of conflict minerals in the technology industry is a serious issue, but one that manufacturers are doing little to correct. In areas where the sale of minerals is used to fund war, the abuses of human rights are abhorrent — with slavery and rape treated as a fact of life.

After traveling to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and interviewing victims of rape used as a weapon of war, photographer Sarah Fretwell put together a powerful photography project documented the people and their stories, photographs that are not just art but are tools for bringing awareness to the larger impact the technology industry has by using conflict minerals, and to the role consumers play by purchasing the products without asking questions about the materials used in manufacturing.

In this interview, partnered with her images, Fretwell describes the problem and outlines solutions.

(via Rape and Conflict Minerals: Photographer Takes on the Technology Industry Through Art : TreeHugger)