This performance of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” by International Space Station Commander Chris Hadfield has been seen and shared by everyone and their mother — seriously, your mom has probably already written about this on Facebook — but it is too wonderful to not share again.
via Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield’s David Bowie cover is an important moment for science

This performance of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” by International Space Station Commander Chris Hadfield has been seen and shared by everyone and their mother — seriously, your mom has probably already written about this on Facebook — but it is too wonderful to not share again.

via Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield’s David Bowie cover is an important moment for science

That the viral response to the music video has created a moment where it is seen as advantageous for editors to program more space-related content (including a post like this, I know) is precisely the goal of using media in the ways Hadfield has. He and his team have brought the world a view of space we have never seen in a way we have never seen. With the myriad issues we face in which science plays a role in solving, we need more people to appreciate and admire science and scientists of all types, so making the subject fun and accessible in space is a great way to do it.

Lastly, as Bonnie Malkin at The Telegraph notes “Hadfield will never need to buy a drink on Earth again,” so he’s also got that going for him, which is nice.

jacobhallgordon

jacobhallgordon:

image

I had the remarkable opportunity last week to tour the headquarters of SpaceX. What do you picture when you imagine a spaceship factory? I wasn’t sure either until I saw it, and then it seemed obvious: it is an enormous facility (outside of Los Angeles where Boeing 747 fuselages used…

credit: NASA Earth Observatory

NASA just published some lovely photos of planet Earth at night, showing the many ways night images can be used for science, including seeing where people live, monitoring black-outs, viewing natural events, and even watching the Aurora lights.

Scroll through to see these beautiful, interesting images and learn about the technology used to capture them.

credit: NASA Earth Observatory

NASA just published some lovely photos of planet Earth at night, showing the many ways night images can be used for science, including seeing where people live, monitoring black-outs, viewing natural events, and even watching the Aurora lights.

Scroll through to see these beautiful, interesting images and learn about the technology used to capture them.

howstuffworks

tinywrld:

minusmanhattan:

This time-lapse video of Earth from the International Space Station is the best time-lapse I’ve ever seen.

Full screen and watch it now, it’s absolutely breathtaking. 

Images courtesy: Image Science & Analysis Laboratory,NASA Johnson Space Center, The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. This version put together by Knate Myers

WOW!  This video is heading for 1 million views in just two days.   My absolute favourite scene at 2’52”   

These NEVER get old. See even more here: 

10 Breathtaking Time-Lapse Videos Showcasing Nature as You’ve Never Seen it Before
jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

We Stopped Dreaming

Neil deGrasse Tyson once gave an epic rant about our bewildering unwillingness to provide more than a fraction of a penny of the American tax dollar to space progress. We aren’t talking about “space exploration” as a singular effort here, I really mean space progress.

We must acknowledge that despite our space program’s birth as an extension of the Cold War, it has evolved into the most publicly accessible source of scientific inspiration in our culture. I’d love to claim that biology could somehow take that crown, but I’ll give the nod to the space folks … because it’s true.

Evan Schurr has created this mashup of Dr. Tyson’s words with a visual history of space exploration. It was inspired by the Sagan Series by Reid Gower (which you should watch, repeatedly). The torch of inspiration for tomorrow’s discoverers is firmly in the hands of Dr. Tyson. Can we commit to one penny of our tax dollar to fund tomorrow?

“How much would you pay … for the universe?”

( Scrunchthethird)

What a great video. Dr. Neil Tyson, we love you. Well done, Evan Schurr.