"For 40 years the citizens of southeast Montana have been repeatedly asked to absorb the impacts of natural resource extraction. We have done our part. We have sacrificed the loss of water, land, property, and quality of life for others to enjoy electricity at the flick of a switch. We have given enough, and the time has come to say no more."
via Things of Intrinsic Worth shows how coal power damages Montana’s ranching lifestyle

"For 40 years the citizens of southeast Montana have been repeatedly asked to absorb the impacts of natural resource extraction. We have done our part. We have sacrificed the loss of water, land, property, and quality of life for others to enjoy electricity at the flick of a switch. We have given enough, and the time has come to say no more."

via Things of Intrinsic Worth shows how coal power damages Montana’s ranching lifestyle

That the viral response to the music video has created a moment where it is seen as advantageous for editors to program more space-related content (including a post like this, I know) is precisely the goal of using media in the ways Hadfield has. He and his team have brought the world a view of space we have never seen in a way we have never seen. With the myriad issues we face in which science plays a role in solving, we need more people to appreciate and admire science and scientists of all types, so making the subject fun and accessible in space is a great way to do it.

Lastly, as Bonnie Malkin at The Telegraph notes “Hadfield will never need to buy a drink on Earth again,” so he’s also got that going for him, which is nice.